Social Security

Lorenzen: Comprehensive Social Security Reform is Best to Address SSDI Insolvency

Ed Lorenzen, Senior Advisor for the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, testified Wednesday in front of the Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee on maintaining the solvency of the Social Security Disability Insurance Trust Fund.

Without congressional action, the trust fund reserves will be depleted next year. The exhaustion of the DI fund, one of the upcoming fiscal speedbumps, would result in a roughly 20 percent across-the-board benefit cut. The President has proposed reallocating money from the Old Age fund to bolster the DI fund. This measure, known as a reallocation, has sparked much debate after a new House rule was adopted requiring legislation implementing such a transfer to also include reforms.

Proponents argue that reallocation is a routine measure, enacted numerous times in the past, and is therefore adequate in the current situation. In his testimony, Lorenzen explained that previous reallocations have often been accompanied by reforms, a precedent that's particularly important to follow this time.

After a thorough review of past reallocations, Lorenzen reaches four major conclusions:

CRFB's Ed Lorenzen Testifies to Congress on SSDI

This afternoon, Ed Lorenzen, Senior Advisor for the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, will testify in front of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Social Security on maintaining the solvency of the Social Security Disability Insurance Trust Fund.

MY VIEW: Jim Kolbe and Charlie Stenholm

Jim Kolbe and Charlie Stenholm are former members of Congress and members of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. Jim Kolbe (R-AZ) served from 1985 to 2007, while Charlie Stenholm (D-TX) served from 1979 to 2005. They wrote a commentary that appeared in Roll Call, which appears below.

The President’s Social Security Proposals

The President proposed last week, through his FY 2016 budget, a number of proposals to reform Social Security in small ways, including measures to shore up the strained Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) Trust Fund by shifting funds from the Old-Age and Survivors' Insurance (OASI) Fund and to improve data sharing and coordination with other agencies. Overall, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) estimates that these measures would save money through better program integrity and increased payroll revenues for the program. OMB expects that over the next 10 years these changes will cut Social Security's costs by $14 billion and increase revenue by roughly $46 billion. 

Here is a summary of the President’s proposed changes to the SSDI program:

    • Reallocating payroll taxes from OASI to SSDI. The budget proposes reallocating an additional 0.9 percent of the payroll tax from the old-age program to the disability program for five years in order to extend the life of the SSDI trust fund to about 2033.
    • Completing Continuing Disability Reviews (CDRs). The budget proposes mandatory funding for CDRs starting in 2017. Annual funding would be determined through a formula rather than the appropriations process. The budget proposes $15.2 billion of new spending for CDRs through 2025 which would generate estimated savings of $37.7 billion. About 80 percent of the spending and a similar proportion of the savings would go to and come from the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, leaving $7 billion of net savings to the SSDI program.

Trust Fund Deadlines Are Closing In

In addition to updating budget projections, CBO's baseline also looks at the state of various government trust funds over the next ten years. Two of the trust funds – the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) and Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) will have to be dealt with this year or next. The other two with later exhaustion dates – Social Security Old Age and Survivors' Insurance (OASI) and Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) – have both seen a drop in the size of reserves. Here's a rundown of each of these four trust funds.

Highway Trust Fund

The last time lawmakers dealt with highway financing, they intended that the expiration of the highway bill and the exhaustion of the HTF both happen at the end of May. Now, it looks like there may be a little time between the two as the general revenue transfer to the HTF may last longer.

Previously, CBO expected there to be a $2 billion shortfall in FY 2015, but that gap has been wiped out in the newest projections by two developments: slightly higher gas tax revenue (from lower gas prices increasing demand) and slightly lower spending from lawmakers freezing spending in 2015 rather than letting it grow with inflation. These developments mean that lawmakers may be able to wait until the summer to deal with the HTF, thus theoretically allowing them to write a new highway bill without dealing with the financing gap for a little bit. These two developments also make a long-term solution slightly easier, reducing the trust fund shortfall by about $10 billion.

 

Disability Insurance Trust Fund

Fiscal Speed Bumps Will Keep the New Congress Busy

Although the 114th Congress is just getting settled, it will have to move quickly to address a series of deadlines with serious policy and fiscal consequences. These "Fiscal Speed Bumps" present serious challenges and risks but also opportunities for policymakers, as we explain in a new paper.

The paper lays out the seven speed bumps -- six this year and one in 2016 -- that policymakers will have to (or should) address this year, what policymakers have usually done in the past, and the consequences of inaction for each. These speed bumps are:

CBO Shows Social Security is in Financial Trouble

It is clear that Social Security faces financial challenges. This year, its own Trustees estimated the combined trust funds would run out of reserves in 2033 while CBO estimated a 2030 exhaustion date. But yesterday, CBO released a more detailed set of numbers, which show their projections of year-by-year revenue and spending, along with a range of other possible outcomes. The results aren’t pretty.

CBO estimates that the Disability Insurance trust fund will run out during FY 2017 and the Old Age and Survivors' Insurance trust fund would run out in 2032. If lawmakers patched up SSDI by reallocating revenue from OASI, the combined trust fund will run out in 2030, at which point benefits would be cut by 26 percent.

The exhaustion of the trust fund is caused by a large run-up in spending over the next few decades while revenue rises only slightly. As a percent of payroll, outlays have already risen significantly from 10.4 percent in 2000 to 13.8 percent in 2014, both a factor of higher spending and relatively slow payroll growth. Going forward, outlays will continue to rise, exceeding 18 percent in 20 years and 20 percent in 75 years, almost twice as much as was spent in 2000. Meanwhile, revenue will creep up only slightly from 12.8 percent of payroll in 2014 to 13.6 percent in 75 years.

As a percent of GDP, outlays would rise from 4.9 percent in 2014 to 5.7 percent in 2024 and 6.4 percent by the mid-2030s. After dipping slightly, spending would rise again, reaching an all-time high of 6.9 percent 75 years from now. Revenue would stay fairly flat at 4.6 percent.

Sen. Coburn Introduces Bill to Reform SSDI

In his final week on Capitol Hill, retiring Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) introduced a bill with a wide-ranging set of measures to, in his words, protect and strengthen the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. Coburn put on the table concrete reform proposals for consideration in the next Congress, advocating for reforms beyond simply restoring solvency to the dwindling DI trust fund:

When the trust fund is exhausted in 2016, many Members of Congress will say we just need to move funds from the Social Security retirement program. Let me be clear: this is not a solution; it is a Band-Aid, a temporary fix that takes money away from seniors and will eventually hurt taxpayers when both funds go broke in 2033.

Coburn proposed a broad mix of proposals, from long-discussed ideas to reform the disability determination process and upgrade SSA’s data sharing and processing systems, to new demonstration projects that help potential beneficiaries remain attached or return to the workforce. This effort is in line with attempts by other policymakers to elevate SSDI to the top of the agenda, notably the SSDI Solutions Initiative, recently launched by former Congressmen Jim McCrery and Earl Pomeroy with support from CRFB, to identify reforms to make the program work better for beneficiaries and those contributing to the system.

Some of the most important reforms proposed in the bill include:

The ABLE Act: A Model for PAYGO

The House passed the ABLE Act yesterday, a bill that helps those who have been disabled since youth accumulate savings. The bill, with an estimated cost of $2 billion over the next 10 years, would create tax-free savings accounts that do not count against the account holder for means-tested programs. The bill is an encouraging example of fiscal responsibility, since it is fully paid for with savings in other parts of the budget.

Currently, low-income individuals cannot accumulate more than a certain amount in their savings accounts without losing SSI and Medicaid payments. For instance, individuals with more than $2,000 or couples with more than $3,000 in savings and assets are ineligible to receive SSI payments. Many have pointed out that these limits prevent people with disabilities save for medical bills, education, or equipment they may need to stay in the workforce

To remedy this, the bill would allow any child or person who became disabled before the age of 26 to establish an ABLE account and contribute up to $14,000 annually (subject to other state caps). The balance of the account would not count against the asset limits for low-income programs. Contributions into the account are made with after-tax dollars but there is no tax on the account's accrued interest or dividends.

Finding a Social Security Solution We Can All Agree On

In October, the National Academy for Social Insurance published a study on Americans' preferred solution to making Social Security solvent. CRFB responded with a post questioning the study's option choices and description of some of the options. NASI's Board Chair Bill Arnone defended their methodology in a subsequent post. The following response was posted by CRFB President Maya MacGuineas.

The National Academy of Social Insurance has done a real service by conducting “trade-off analyses” to better understand how Americans would fix a Social Security program quickly headed toward insolvency. By forcing Americans to fully understand and weigh various options, rather than just asking about them in isolation, a trade-off analysis has the power to better simulate the tough choices that lawmakers will face in adjusting the program.

As we wrote in our blog, however, NASI’s trade-off analysis falls short in some areas that cause us to question the results. As we explained, the survey omits the single largest and most prominent set of benefit options – gradual adjustments to the initial benefit – which have been in nearly all plans that restore solvency by slowing benefit growth or with a balance of revenue and spending options. On top of that, many of the choices are framed in fashions that are not parallel with each other, likely leading participants to favor certain choices over others.

Syndicate content