Social Security

Discussion with CBO Director Elmendorf on the Costs of Waiting to Address Fiscal Challenges

At the House Budget Committee hearing on CBO's Long-Term Outlook, Rep. Reid Ribble (R-WI), who last week sent a letter calling for action on Social Security, asked CBO director Doug Elmendorf about the cost of waiting for solutions on Social Security.

CBO: Social Security Looks Much Worse Than We Thought

Although some argue that policymakers can wait to solve our long-term entitlement problems, CBO's recent Long-Term Budget Outlook suggests otherwise. According to their projections, the Social Security program is in particular trouble -- and much worse than we thought. According to CBO's latest projections, the trust fund will become insolvent three years earlier than what we previously thought, and its long-term funding gap is 50 percent larger.

Congressman Ribble Calls for Action on Social Security

Recently, Congressman Reid Ribble (R-WI) sent a letter to his colleagues in Congress calling for them to use the upcoming fiscal discussions to push for comprehensive Social Security reform to make it solvent  for future generations.

Making Disability Insurance Work Better

Naturally, lawmakers are diverting their attention to resolving sequestration, the debt ceiling, and the expiring continuing resolution, but another important budget matter is only a couple of years away. The Social Security Disability Insurance Program will exhaust its trust fund by 2016, at which point benefits will either need to be cut by 20 percent or transfers will need to be made from the old-age fund, shortening its lifespan by two years (2035 to 2033).

Orlando Sentinel: Make Social Security Part of Budget Solution

While many in Washington are bracing for more partisan brinksmanship in the upcoming negotiations over the debt ceiling and a potential government shutdown, it is easy to overlook the fact that these fiscal debates present an opportunity for a bipartisan compromise on a comprehensive deficit reduction deal. This morning, the Orlando Sentinel published an editorial making that case for including Social Security in the debate:

Disability Insurance and the Great Recession

Update: A new note from the Office of the Chief Actuary of the Social Security Administration finds that allowance rates actually fell during the Great Recession. The Coe and Rutledge brief appears to have been removed from the website for the time being. This blog includes an extra paragraph discussing the SSA's findings.

CAP's Proposal to Improve Retirement Accounts

With President Obama set to give a speech in the coming weeks on retirement security, the Center for American Progress (CAP) has released a report describing a new retirement account that intends to improve on current 401(k)-type plans.

Want to Protect Low-Income Individuals? Look Toward a Grand Bargain

Today, a piece in the Financial Times shows the unnecessary damage being done by the ongoing sequester -- in this case, sharp cuts to federal support for low-income housing.

Celebrating 78 Years of Social Security

It's August 14 and that means it is Social Security's birthday! The program has been around for 78 years, providing retirement security to the elderly and support for the disabled. But the demographics have changed over the past 78 years and financial projections clearly show that reforms will be needed to ensure the program can continue to provide those benefits.

Watch 160 Years of Population Aging...In One Chart

Over at Calculated Risk, Bill McBride has created an animated chart showing America's age distribution evolve, as far back as 1900 to the current day to the projected age distributions through 2060.

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