Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

Media Coverage

Nov 10, 2016|The Washington Post

12 Trump promises and how he could fulfill them

The sequester went into effect in 2013 but was a part of the Budget Control Act of 2011. According to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, this would cost $450 billion through 2026. 

Nov 10, 2016|Financial Review

Wall Street rises, bets on Donald Trump inflation

Before the election, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated Mr Trump's  tax and spending plan could add $US10 trillion to US government debt over a decade.
 

Nov 10, 2016|Financial Review

There's never been a worse time to have too much debt

The non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has also done the numbers and forecast that Trump's policies will increase the nation's debt by $US5.3 trillion.

 

Nov 10, 2016|Bloomberg Businessweek

Trump’s Big Challenge: Getting Things Done Without Money

Trump has promised to cut taxes massively while keeping the government’s hands off Social Security and Medicare—autopilot programs that are consuming a growing share of the budget. “New spending would be more than 10 times larger than new revenue” under Trump’s plan, according to a Nov. 4 report from a pair of Washington nonprofits, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. The biggest category of new spending in the Trump administration, the report says, would be interest on the national debt.

Nov 10, 2016|Bloomberg Markets

Bond Investors Again Step Back From U.S. Debt on Trump Policies

The real-estate magnate’s economic proposals include projects that would boost the federal debt by $5.3 trillion, according to estimates from the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Nov 10, 2016|CBS News

Donald Trump and your wallet: Many unknowns

Taxes. This is one area where Trump has released a detailed schematic, much of it borrowed from House Speaker Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican who specializes in fiscal matters...What remains fuzzy is how he would pay for this epic tax plan and how sustainable it is. Mainly due to his tax cut, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget calculates the federal debt would balloon by $5.3 trillion in 10 years (it’s $19.3 trillion now).

Nov 9, 2016|News 12 Long Island

Trump's election puts LI, nation's financial future in spotlight

Trump has promised to lower taxes by $4.4 trillion over 10 years and vowed to cut regulations on companies. He also said he would create 25 million jobs. Some critics claim Trump's plan would benefit only the wealthy and harm the middle class. The non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget put his plan's price tag as high as $6 trillion over 10 years.

Nov 9, 2016|Business Vancouver

Financial implications of Trump presidency are uncertain for Canada: economists

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan policy group that examines fiscal and budget issues, said Trump’s plans as outlined in his campaign platform could double the U.S.’s budget deficit to 5% of GDP per year. This could add $5 trillion to the debt in the next 10 years.

Nov 9, 2016|Forbes

A Tax Cut Is On The Way In The U.S., But The Devil Will Be In Trump's Details

Trump provided no plan to finance his tax cut. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that Trump has proposed no net spending reductions to offset his tax plan’s  $7 trillion increase in the debt. 

Nov 9, 2016|Bloomberg View

How Trump Could Help the Fed

The non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that under Trump’s economic agenda, U.S. government debt held by the public would reach about 150 percent of gross domestic product by 2036, nearly double the current ratio.

Nov 9, 2016|Bloomberg

Pimco Joins Bond Traders Seeing Fast-Tracked Fed After Trump

Trump, the 70-year-old real estate magnate and president-elect, has made pledges including cutting taxes and spending as much as $500 billion on infrastructure. His proposals would boost the nation’s debt by $5.3 trillion, the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated. 

Nov 9, 2016|Bloomberg

Trump’s Tax-Cut Plans May Draw Congress to Art of the Deal

During the campaign, Trump’s tax plan stirred concern that it would result in deficits and add as much as $5.3 trillion to the federal debt over the next decade, according to an estimate by the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. 

Nov 9, 2016|CNBC

How Trump's tax plan may impact your returns

Trump has proposed no net spending reductions to offset his tax plan's $7 trillion increase in the debt, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget's estimates.

Nov 9, 2016|The Washington Post

A new sign Republicans will give Donald Trump the same pass they gave Bush

Trump's proposals — which include an unprecedented $1 trillion infrastructure spending plan over 10 years and trillions more in tax cuts — would grow the debt far more than under current law, as this chart from the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget shows.

Nov 9, 2016|The New York Times

Change Ahead: Shifts on Immigration, Climate, Health and Taxes

An analysis by the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated that Mr. Trump’s plans would increase the federal debt by $5.3 trillion over the next decade, and raise the ratio of debt to gross domestic product to 105 percent.

Nov 9, 2016|Reuters

Trump win casts doubt on Fed's plans to hike interest rates

Adding to the uncertainty for the Fed and calling its further rate path into question is the lack of detail in Trump's economic plans. He has proposed giving states more discretion in spending federal money on health insurance for the poor, but offered little specifics. Trump has also promised cuts in individual and business tax rates, but some economists questioned the assumptions underpinning the plan and a lack of clarity as to how the breaks would be funded.

The Committee for a Responsible Budget said this has made it difficult to evaluate Trump's proposals, but estimated they could add $5.3 trillion to the federal debt over 10 years.

Nov 9, 2016|Reuters

COLUMN-Welcome to the Trump inflation: James Saft

Even before the shock of the election, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget was forecasting that President Trump would increase debt to more than 100 percent of annual output by 2026.

Nov 9, 2016|Associated Press

For Global Economy, Trump Victory Intensifies Uncertainties

Among other things, Trump has floated the idea of neglecting the national debt to negotiate for better terms. He argued that he can boost growth by cutting taxes for the wealthy, slashing regulations and reducing the country's dependence on imports. The flip side, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, is that Trump's plans would raise the national debt by $5.3 trillion over 10 years. This would be on top of the $9 trillion that the national debt is already projected to rise by the Congressional Budget Office. The increase in debt risks making it more expensive for the United States to borrow.

Nov 9, 2016|Sydney Morning Herald

The consequences of a Donald Trump win are disastrous for the Australian economy

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget says after 10 years US national debt will hit 105 per cent of GDP under Trump. Under Clinton, it would hit 86 per cent.

Nov 9, 2016|CBS News

Trump's win turns stock market into shock market

And let’s not forget that Trump’s economic policies amount to a massive fiscal stimulus since they would add to the national debt, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. This could be a much-needed boost to the economy, as tax cuts and infrastructure spending lift GDP growth.

Nov 9, 2016|The Telegraph

Q&A: What does Donald Trump’s Presidential victory mean for the economy?

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that Mr Trump’s plans would add $5.3 trillion to the US national debt.

Nov 9, 2016|Money Magazine

What Trump’s Win Means for Your Wallet

One criticism of Trump’s plan is that the benefits skew to the wealthy. An analysis by the Tax Foundation, a right leaning think-tank, found middle-class earners — those making roughly $50,000 a year — would keep, on average, an extra $1,000 a year. By contrast, the top 1% of earners — those who make $450,000 and up — would get more than $100,000 on average. Another potential problem is how he would pay for the plan. The Trump campaign argues that the cuts will spur economic growth and eventually pay for themselves, but budget scorers have been far more skeptical. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget put the Trump plan’s price tag as high as $6 trillion over 10 years.

Nov 9, 2016|Market Watch

Donald Trump says he will honor ‘forgotten men and women’ as president

In many cases, it was Trump’s controversial remarks that led would-be allies to back away from him. His economic policies have also drawn fire and praise. One example of wonkish worrying: the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget found that federal debt would explode under Trump, to 147% of gross domestic product by 2036. 

Nov 8, 2016|Memphis Business Journal

Election 2016: Where Clinton, Trump stand on business issues

Trump: He would ask Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act, including the individual mandate requiring everyone to have health insurance; allow insurance companies to sell health insurance across state lines; and allow people to deduct the cost of their premiums from their taxes...The Center for Health and Economy estimated 18 million more people would be uninsured, while the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated it at 21 million. But premiums would fall. Trump would allow importation of drugs from foreign countries. 

Nov 8, 2016|Bloomberg

Treasuries Lead Global Bond Rally as Trump Set to Win Election

Trump made pledges including cutting taxes and spending as much as $500 billion on infrastructure. His proposals would boost the nation’s debt by $5.3 trillion, the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimated. The government’s marketable debt has already more than doubled under Obama, to a record of almost $14 trillion.

Nov 8, 2016|Business Insider

Hillary Clinton has a plan to make college debt-free — here's how

She previously proposed spending $350 billion over 10 years for the plan and has moved that estimate up to $500 billion, in part by cutting tax deductions for high-income Americans. She said the proposal would not add any money to the national debt...The plan does say it will be funded by closing loopholes. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, an independent, nonpartisan nonprofit organization, has found that the plan could be funded this way.

Nov 8, 2016|Fox Business Network

Maya MacGuineas on Fox Business

“One of the really discouraging things is that – at a time when our tax code desperately needs to be reformed – I don’t think we’ve had any real, credible tax reform plans put forward” -- Maya MacGuineas 

Nov 7, 2016|Voice of America

Next US President Faces Economic Concerns

Maya MacGuineas is the president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. The group is non-partisan, meaning it stays away from party politics. MacGuineas says whoever wins the presidency will have a difficult time keeping campaign promises. “Donald Trump, for instance, has promised not to fix entitlement programs -- Medicare and Social Security. Hillary Clinton has promised not to raise taxes on any family making below $250,000. Well that sounds nice, but if you want to spend as much as she wants to, you can’t fix this problem from just taxing the rich alone.”

Nov 7, 2016|Reuters Breaking Views

Trumping markets

Similarly, Trump would need Congress to pass his massive tax cuts. Even if a Republican-leaning Senate and House were to approve Trump’s budget – far from given – it would take years for the nation’s precarious finances to scare off investors. These would expand the federal debt by $5.3 trillion, according to the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. 

Nov 7, 2016|Financial Times

Trump and Clinton: key policies

Mr Trump and Mrs Clinton have made expensive promises that mean neither would reverse the growth of the US’s nearly $20tn national debt (including future social security payments), according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

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