Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget

Media Coverage

Oct 9, 2016|The Washington Post

The new reactionaries

To ensure the economy’s revival, Trump would resort to the standard Republican cure for slow growth: massive tax cuts. These would cost roughly $5 trillion over a decade, reckons the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Oct 8, 2016|The Economist

More present than correct

Mrs Clinton’s refreshed plan will cost anywhere between $350 billion and $800 billion over a decade, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a think-tank. Much of that cash will flow to students who will go on to be affluent. 

Oct 8, 2016|Market Watch

‘Scorched earth’ might be all that’s left in Washington after this election

Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, said voters are rejecting economic experts and pulling both political parties in directions that might lead their solutions to economic problems to “make the situation worse, not better,” according to Democrats have to come up with an agenda that won’t double the size of government, MacGuineas said, while Republicans have to figure out how to bring conservative ideas back to a party that has become very populist.

Oct 7, 2016|The New York Times

What About the Planet?

Somehow Elaine Quijano, the moderator, found time for not one but two questions inspired by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget — an organization concerned that despite relatively low budget deficits now and extremely low borrowing costs, the federal government may face fiscal problems a couple of decades down the line. 

Oct 6, 2016|CNN Money

Is anyone worried about America's $19 trillion debt?

The debt situation is only expected to get worse in the coming years. Both Trump and Hillary Clinton will increase the debt, according to a thorough analysis of the candidates' plans by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Oct 6, 2016|The Hill

Trump adds high-risk pools to healthcare plan

An analysis from the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget in March found that Trump’s healthcare plan would lead to 21 million people losing coverage. Repealing ObamaCare would cause 22 million people to lose coverage, and Trump’s replacements would only add back around 1 million, the study found.

Oct 6, 2016|AEI

When evaluating Trump-onomics, don’t forget the Fed

Donald Trump has big, big plans if elected. A $4 trillion tax cut plan. A $500 billion infrastructure plan. A $700 billion childcare plan. Of course the cost estimates are hardly concrete or precise. But by one projection, Trump-onomics would increase the federal debt by more than $5 trillion over the next decade vs. the current baseline forecast. It would take the federal debt-GDP ratio from nearly 77 % of GDP today to 105% by 2026, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Oct 5, 2016|Money Magazine

Here’s What the Economic Pundits Said on Twitter About the Vice Presidential Debate

Moderator Elaine Quijano of CBS News started off discussion of the economy by citing a government watchdog’s report: “According to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, neither of your economic plans will reduce the growing $19 trillion gross national debt. In fact, your plans would add even more to it.”

Oct 5, 2016|CNBC

Kaine vs. Pence on the economy

"Both candidates weren't willing to have a real, direct discussion about any policy changes that they would make to tackle these challenges. Nothing on entitlement reform, spending reforms, even real tax reform that would generate real revenues," said Maya MacGuineas. "We need to take those steps as part of a comprehensive economic plan."

Oct 5, 2016|McClatchy

Clinton and Trump now might be forced to say how they will fix Social Security

That Social Security emerged in Tuesday’s debate might mean the candidates will be asked more questions about it before Election Day. “Neither has a plan to save Social Security or stem the growth of our debt. That makes the last two presidential debates all the more important,” Maya MacGuineas, the head of the watchdog group Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, said in a statement Wednesday.

 

Oct 5, 2016|The Daily Signal

The Government Spends $1.5 Billion Per Year on Public Relations and Ads, Watchdog Finds

Over the past decade, federal agencies have spent money that qualifies as public relations and advertising spending on things such as webcams at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo that allow visitors to its website to see specific animals, campaigns from the Department of Transportation against distracted driving, and publicized information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Zika virus, the GAO found.

Though the federal government’s spending on public relations and advertising may appear to be significant, Marc Goldwein, senior vice president at the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, said it’s merely a “drop in the pool.”

Oct 5, 2016|Homeland Security News

Pence and Kaine Engage in Spirited Vice-Presidential Debate

Quijano asked both candidates:  “According to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, neither of your economic plans will reduce the growing $19 trillion gross national debt. In fact, your plans would add even more to it. Both of you were governors who balanced state budgets. Are you concerned that adding more to the debt could be disastrous for the country?”

Both candidates failed to answer this question. Neither Kaine nor Pence addressed the real driver of the national debt: the increase in entitlement spending.

Oct 4, 2016|The Huffington Post

Donald Trump’s Plan To Fix Taxes Would Be Great For Donald Trump

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget recently determined that Trump’s agenda, in its latest incarnation, would add more than $5 trillion to the national debt over the coming decade. (Hillary Clinton’s agenda, by contrast, would add just $200 billion ― which is not much more than a rounding error in this sort of exercise.)

Oct 4, 2016|Wyofile

Why do voters think Trump will be good for Wyoming?

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has estimated that Trump’s plan, which includes massive tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans, would increase the national debt by more than $5 trillion during the next four years. Republicans who say reducing our debt is their No. 1 priority should be apoplectic, not defending this nominee.

Oct 4, 2016|The Washington Post

Kaine and Pence flatly ignored a question about a national debt

Asked about how their running mates’ plans would affect the national debt, both Tim Kaine and Mike Pence offered extended, detailed discussions of their economic agenda — without initially answering the question from moderator Elaine Quijano of CBS News. The data come from the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a nonpartisan group in Washington that conducts research and advocates for controlling the national debt. The committee projects that Clinton’s proposals would increase the national debt by about $200 billion over a decade, relative to current projections. The proposals from Trump, the Republican nominee, would increase the national debt by 26 times that amount — roughly $5.3 trillion, according to the committee.

Oct 4, 2016|The Blaze

Mike Pence: Trump ‘used the tax code just the way it’s supposed to be used’

The nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has analyzed both Clinton’s and Trump’s policy proposals and determined that Trump would increase the national debt by $5.3 trillion over 10 years. In comparison, Clinton would increase the debt by just $200 billion, the think tank found.

Oct 4, 2016|Vox

VP debate moderator says both campaigns add to the debt. Trump's plan adds a lot, LOT more

We expect conservative nominees to propose tax and spending cuts, and those two things are usually somewhat proportional. But even the revision of Trump's plan is not really feasible, unless he wants to balloon the national debt by $5.3 trillion. Again, Clinton’s plan would increase it by only about $200 billion, according to an analysis by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Oct 4, 2016|Vox

2 winners and 4 losers from the vice presidential debate

The night was also a victory for Washington establishmentarians who are, more than anything, terrified of the national debt. One of the first questions moderator Elaine Quijano asked relied on the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget’s analysis of the impact of the candidates’ plans on the debt, admonishing them for not coming up with plans to reduce it. 

Oct 4, 2016|Associated Press

AP FACT CHECK: Pence on National Debt

Would Clinton similarly increase the debt? Not according to an analysis by the independent Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. The Clinton plan with its tax increases would increase the gross debt — both privately and publicly held— by $450 billion over 10 years. Mind you, that is on top of an $8.8 trillion increase already projected by the government under current law. As for Trump, the committee says his tax-cut-heavy plan would increase the gross debt by $4.3 trillion —nearly 10 times more than Clinton's plan would do.

Oct 4, 2016|CNN

Kaine, Pence debate: CNN's Reality Check Team vets the claims

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a bipartisan think tank, estimates Trump's plan would add $5.3 trillion to the national debt in the first decade. In contrast, Clinton has proposed increasing government spending, but also hiking taxes on the wealthy. The result, according to the CRFB, would be a much smaller increase in the national debt -- $200 billion.

Oct 4, 2016|CBS News

2016 Vice Presidential Debate Part 4: Social Security

Senator Kaine, on the issue of Social Security, in 18 years, when the Social Security Trust Funds run out of money, you’ll be 76. The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates your benefits could be cut by as much as $7,500 per year. What would your administration do to prevent this cut?

Oct 4, 2016|Fox News

Part 2 of vice presidential debate at Longwood University

According to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, neither of your economic plans will reduce the growing $19 trillion gross national debt. In fact, your plans would add even more to it. Both of you were governors who balanced state budgets. Are you concerned that adding more to the debt could be disastrous for the country. Governor Pence?

Oct 3, 2016|Vox

Donald Trump's tax plan makes impossible promises. This cartoon explains

We expect conservative nominees to propose tax cuts and spending cuts, and those two things are usually somewhat proportional. But even the revision of Trump's plan is not really feasible, unless he wants to balloon the national debt by $5.3 trillion. To be clear, Hillary Clinton's plan would also add to the national debt — but only by $200 billion, according to ananalysis by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Oct 3, 2016|The Guardian

Back to the future: economy becomes battle between Reagan and Bill Clinton

According to his advisers, the theory – ridiculed by Hillary Clinton as “Trumped-up trickle down” – harks back to the 1980s, when Ronald Reagan sought to stimulate wealth creation with tax cuts. Yet new analysis by an independent Washington thinktank, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, estimates that if Trump’s proposed tax cuts did not bring about the promised Reagan-style boom, they would risk adding $5.3tn to the national debt.

Oct 3, 2016|Philadelphia Inquirer

The White House race that got displaced

Imagine Hillary pressed on findings of the independent, bipartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget that say her spending plan adds $200 billion to the national debt (the committee says Trump's adds much more) despite her proposed higher taxes on business and the wealthy or how she'd get such taxes through a likely GOP Congress.

Oct 3, 2016|Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Responsible budget committee fears presidential campaigns are ignoring national debt

Donald Trump’s economic plan could add $5 trillion to the national debt in the next 10 years and few seem to notice except the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget (CRFB).

Oct 2, 2016|The Washington Post

Trump’s BFF: Rosy Scenario

What’s also forgotten is that both Trump’s and Hillary Clinton’s programs accept the deficits of existing policies. That’s about $8 trillion over a decade. Clinton’s proposals would also add to these, but much less than Trump’s. The nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that Clinton’s policies would increase the debt by about $200 billion above existing deficits for the decade.

Oct 2, 2016|San Antonio Express-News

Why the U.S. economy isn’t quite the weakling Trump says it is

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget estimates that Trump’s proposals would add $5.3 trillion to the federal debt over the next decade, versus $200 billion for Hillary Clinton’s plans.

Oct 2, 2016|Reason

Donald Trump's Billion-Dollar Tax Loss Is a Diversion From More-Serious Matters

According to the latest numbers from theCommittee for a Responsible Federal Budget, Hillary Clinton would hike spending and taxes over the next decade from its already-upward trajectory and historically high levels, while Trump would reduce expected increases in spending but slash tax revenues by far more (thus resulting in yet-bigger deficits).

Oct 2, 2016|Wichita Eagle

Debate barely mentioned debt

Clinton’s proposals are less irresponsible. All total, her tax and spending plans are projected to increase the national debt by about $200 billion over 10 years, according to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. In contrast, Trump’s tax cuts and other budget plans are projected to increase the debt by $5.3 trillion over 10 years, according to CRFB.

 

Pages