Press Release

Joint Statement on the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform

What CRFB Would Like to See in the FY 2011 Budget

CHAIRMAN
Bill Frenzel
Tim Penny
Charlie Stenholm

 
PRESIDENT
Maya MacGuineas
­­­
 
DIRECTORS
Barry Anderson
Roy Ash
Charles Bowsher
Steve Coll
Dan Crippen
Vic Fazio
Willis Gradison
William Gray, III
William Hoagland
Douglas Holtz-Eakin
Jim Jones
Lou Kerr
Jim Kolbe
James Lynn
James McIntrye, Jr.
David Minge
Jim Nussle
Marne Obernauer, Jr.
June O'Neill
Rudolph Penner
Peter Peterson
Robert Reischauer
Alice Rivlin
Martin Sabo
Gene Steuerle
David Stockman
Paul Volcker
Carol Cox Wait
David M. Walker
Joseph Wright, Jr.
 

SENIOR ADVISORS
Elmer Staats
Robert Strauss
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


What CRFB Would Like to See in the FY 2011 Budget
January 28, 2010



On Monday, February 1, President Obama will unveil his FY 2011 budget. Although the President offered a preview of some portions of the budget last night, many questions remain. Given the United States’ mounting debt, the budget must begin the process of closing our fiscal gap. In particular, CRFB hopes that the administration’s FY 2011 budget request:

1) Commits to an ambitious, yet attainable, fiscal goal. Given the nation’s current fiscal picture, U.S. creditors need to be reassured that the country intends to take control of our future debt path; to do this, the country needs an aggressive, yet realistic, fiscal goal. The Peterson-Pew Commission on Budget Reform has recommended stabilizing the debt at 60% of GDP by 2018, but this is by no means the only option. The important thing is that a goal be ambitious enough to avert a fiscal crisis, but realistic enough that it is viewed as credible. It is also important that a fiscal goal capture the need to deal with both the medium- and long-term fiscal imbalances – such as the case with a goal of stabilizing the debt so it does not grow as a share of the economy once the target is hit.

2) Details specific actions for meeting fiscal goals. It isn’t enough to set a fiscal target; the President must also provide specific policy proposals to achieve the goal. The partial discretionary spending freeze President Obama discussed last night is a good start, but stabilizing the debt likely will require changes to Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, defense, and tax policy as well.

3)Avoids using gimmicks. The President’s budget must be able to meet his fiscal targets without relying on any budget gimmicks. For example, assuming that certain policies will expire when they are unlikely to can make it seem easier to stabilize the debt. Relying on unspecified savings (sometimes called “magic asterisks”), such as those suggested by a fiscal commission, also would be problematic – unless some type of “trigger” were put in place to implement tangible policies if an agreement could not be reached.

4) Enforces fiscal targets through budget rules and process reform. To codify his proposed targets, we encourage the President to insist on fiscal rules – such as an exemption-free PAYGO, statutory budget caps, and a debt trigger – to help maintain the fiscal path Congress chooses. Other reforms designed to bring transparency, order, and a focus on the long-term to the budget process also would be helpful.

“This is a critical year for the budget,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “As the White House pivots from focusing on economic recovery to reducing the deficit, it needs to start the discussion by presenting an aggressive and credible budget. But the story doesn’t end there. It is an election year and President Obama will have to use a good deal of his political capital to get Congress to work with him on enacting any of the tough measures he is willing to put forth.”

 


Click here for a pdf version of this release.

For press inquiries, please contact Kate Brown at (202) 596-3365 or brown@newamerica.net.

 

CRFB Reacts to the State of the Union Address

CHAIRMAN
Bill Frenzel
Tim Penny
Charlie Stenholm

 
PRESIDENT
Maya MacGuineas
­­­
 
DIRECTORS
Barry Anderson
Roy Ash
Charles Bowsher
Steve Coll
Dan Crippen
Vic Fazio
Willis Gradison
William Gray, III
William Hoagland
Douglas Holtz-Eakin
Jim Jones
Lou Kerr
Jim Kolbe
James Lynn
James McIntrye, Jr.
David Minge
Jim Nussle
Marne Obernauer, Jr.
June O'Neill
Rudolph Penner
Peter Peterson
Robert Reischauer
Alice Rivlin
Martin Sabo
Gene Steuerle
David Stockman
Paul Volcker
Carol Cox Wait
David M. Walker
Joseph Wright, Jr.
 

SENIOR ADVISORS
Elmer Staats
Robert Strauss


CRFB Reacts to the State of the Union Address
January 27, 2010



The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget commends President Obama for his focus on deficit reduction in his State of the Union address, and hopes that he will follow through by pressing Congress to enact medium- and long-term deficit reduction policies over the next year.

As the President remarked tonight, we find ourselves in a “massive fiscal hole… a challenge that makes all others that much harder to solve.” And he argued, rightly so, that “if we do not take meaningful steps to rein in our debt, it could damage our markets, increase the cost of borrowing, and jeopardize our recovery.”

The President offered three proposals, in particular, which would be promising steps in the right direction:

  • A three-year non-security discretionary spending freeze, beginning in fiscal year 2011, and enforced by a veto, if necessary;
  • A bipartisan fiscal commission – created by executive order and fashioned after the Conrad-Gregg proposal – to provide a specific set of solutions to our fiscal problems;
  • The reinstatement of statutory pay-as-you-go laws (although as we’ve mentioned before, we are concerned about the large number of exemptions).

“We are thrilled that President Obama understands the threat of ever-rising debt, and is making some concrete proposals to begin to address it,” said Maya MacGuineas, President of the Committee for a Responsible Budget. “But actions speak louder than words. In the coming weeks and months, we urge the President to bring together members of both parties and begin taking concrete actions to stabilize the debt once the economy recovers.” 

 


Click here for a pdf version of this release.

For press inquiries, please contact Kate Brown at (202) 596-3365 or brown@newamerica.net.

 

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