CRFB Releases and Events

Not Stepping Backward: CRFB's Paper on Budget Gimmicks

In his recent testimony, CBO directory Doug Elmendorf argued that it would be beneficial for policymakers to make large improvements to our budgetary picture, but that small steps forward would be better than nothing, and "no steps at all would be better than stepping backward." Budget gimmicks fall squarely into that stepping backwards category by potentially offsetting real costs with phony savings.

Looking Beyond the Ten-Year Window

Our paper released yesterday detailed how our long term debt problems are far from solved, making clear the unsustainability of federal debt over the long term and how much deficit reduction remains to fix it. As policymakers consider how to achieve long term deficit reduction, they must make sure they effectively evaluate policy options available to them, and have better information on the long term impact of different policies. 

CRFB Shows that Long-Term Problems Remain Very Far From Solved

Today, CRFB has released a new paper, Our Long-Term Debt Problems Are Very Far from Solved, which shows while recent improvements may have benefited our budget outlook over the short and medium term, we have made little progress on the long term and sizable challenges still remain.

The Budget Conference Committee's First Meeting

The first meeting of the budget conference committee is today! The committee will have a month and a half to reconcile the House and Senate-passed budgets and come up with a longer-term solution on appropriations and the debt ceiling. You can watch the live proceedings on C-SPAN here right now.

Event Recap: Leon Panetta and Others Urge Action on Fiscal Issues

Yesterday, former Defense Secretary and CRFB board member Leon Panetta headlined a press conference at the National Press Club on the need for our lawmakers to come together and work toward a comprehensive debt deal.

Event Recap: CRFB Hosts 'Defining Moments in Debt'

On September 18, CRFB hosted "Defining Moments in Debt," a panel discussion at the Captial Visitor Center about the many impending "fiscal speed bumps," approaching this fall. There was widespread agreement about the severity of the upcoming debt limit and potential shutdown, as well as the unsustainablity of the budget in the long term. The panel was moderated by CNNMoney writer Jeanne Sahadi, and featured:

Streaming Live: Defining Moments for the Debt

This morning, at 9 AM Eastern time at the Capitol Visitors Center, CRFB will host "Defining Moments for the Debt," an event which will discuss the many "fiscal speed bumps" that are coming in the next month. The event will be highlighted by a heavy-hitting and diverse panel discussion, moderated by CNNMoney writer Jeanne Sahadi and featuring:

CRFB's Breakdown of the Long-Term Outlook

CBO's Long-Term Budget Outlook is a sizeable 126-page document with tons of facts and figures, and an accompanying spreadsheet with even more data. In order to help people pull out the key findings and takeaways from the report, we've condensed the document down to a concise 7-page analysis of the key facts and figures.

As the Fed Meets, CRFB Quantifies Interest Rate Risk Facing the Budget

Beginning tomorrow, the Federal Open Market Committee, the Fed's interest rate setting and deliberative body that meets eight times a year -- will meet for two days to make decisions about the future path of U.S. monetary policy. In particular, many are looking to see whether the Fed will begin a "taper" and slow the rate of asset purchases, signaling the beginning of an unwind of the Fed's expanded balance sheet.

TOMORROW: Moment of Truth Project to Host Delivery Systems and Payment Reform Briefing with NCHC

Tomorrow, September 12, CRFB's Moment of Truth Project and the National Coalition on Health Care will host a briefing on Medicare delivery system and payment reforms. The briefing will begin at 10:30 AM in the Capitol Visitor Center with presentations by John Rother of NCHC, and Ed Lorenzen of the Moment of Truth Project. Sarah Kliff of the Washington Post will moderate a panel discussion with Bipartisan Policy Center's Bill Hoagland and the Brookings Institution's Keith Fontenot.

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